Working (and Thinking) Outside the Box

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We have all heard the phrase, “stroke of genius.” Hearing this phrase likely conjures up images of people like Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs, forward thinkers and innovators who have impacted the future as we know it.  In today’s world, we need more of these types of thinkers, but what sets them apart?  The answer is a willingness to look at the future to find solutions for today. The answer is imagination.

Traditionally, the workplace has been a think tank for grand ideas that keep companies in business. But what if the workplace of the future is different than our parents’ generations, and even our own? The office will not be defined by history’s concepts of what it should be; it no longer has to be defined or confined by cubicles or walls. Today, the possibility of imagination needs to be broadened outside the meeting room.

Re-imagine “Outside the Box”

“Thinking outside the box” is a phrase most employees have heard. Let’s consider that phrase in the literal sense – removing the physical barriers of the “office box.” It’s time to recognize where ideas happen and where imagination flourishes. It is true that ideas can happen within the workplace, but it is equally true that they can happen anywhere one finds inspiration. According to research from Forrester, “It’s imperative that business leaders initiate programs that keep their workforce productive and connected while mobile and remote.” People may need to work from places of inspiration such as their family home or on the road.

The reasoning is two-fold: more workers choose to work remotely everyday, and flexible work arrangements offer workers freedom from the confines of an office to think more creatively. Often, the confines of a stagnate work environment can fail to ignite innovative thinking due to lack of outside stimulation. In addition, workers can feel hampered by unspoken rules of etiquette and procedure within the formality of a rigid office space. A corporate hierarchy inhibits free flowing ideas and imagination by limiting workers from approaching superiors they might have approached in an otherwise less formal environment – a reason many companies have internal networking events. Thus, organizations are presented a challenge where internal office employees may feel isolated or under-inspired, while employees outside the office have ideas that require discussion among colleagues. To help solve this challenge, today’s workers need to be empowered with the tools that break down barriers of remoteness and access to help eliminate the limitations offices can create: both internally and externally. If we want to inspire workers to think outside of the box, then we need to do just that – get them outside the box – to comfortable environments where ideas flourish, but let them be freely available to the office when an idea needs to come to fruition.

The End of Office Silos

Technology has long been heralded as the future of business, from the advent of the printing press to the breakthrough of the modern computer, it has enhanced the business world. As technology progresses so do workers, but exactly how does technology un-confine? It creates and strengthens the opportunities for collaboration and people are beginning to take advantage.

When asked what their primary concern was for their first job, 57 percent of younger Americans wanted to do something enjoyable or make a difference in society. For example, a group of Millennials are working remotely while traveling around the globe on a program called Remote Year. The younger generation is embracing flexibility because they will need to always be on the hunt for new work during their careers; and for those who are successful at finding new work, their ability to learn new roles and organizations helps make them more nimble and competitive to an industry’s changing demands. According to the U.S Department of Labor, the median tenure of workers ages 55 to 64 was more than three times that of workers ages 25 to 34 years. Younger workers are spending less time at the same job and contracting more, leading to fluidity within the work market.  Technology platforms make it easy for employees and contractors to work from around the globe, enabling workers to literally “work outside the box”.

Look at any modern day office and you will see people connected by emails, phones, online chat groups, and more.  Collaboration is happening all around us in real time.  However, technology is also creating limitations. Emails go unanswered or unseen. Phone messages don’t always get relayed, and people connect to the physical office space by wires and walls. Workers need to be certain their message was received, so smartphones, Google Hangouts, and video conferencing has been added to the mix. Telepresence technology has advanced to the point where workers may connect their computer to a telepresence device in the workplace from anywhere around the globe – giving them a physical presence within the office space and “being there” for colleagues. Suitable Technologies and our Beam telepresence devices focus on allowing companies to tear down the silos that previously existed between remote workers and their offices – encouraging more collaboration and brainstorming, more efficiency and more real-time interaction and synergy between colleagues. The abundance of these kinds of technologies gives workers the flexibility they need to work and think beyond the limitations of generations past and let imagination flourish.

Allowing Imagination to Thrive

It is clear that as imagination grows, and technology is embraced, the future office will look vastly different. Research has long shown that geographical diversification within the workforce is happening, and businesses that want to succeed need to support the future workplace now.  Employees are demanding more flexibility as schedules become increasingly more hectic and work days get longer; they want the quiet comfort of home on some days, the intense collaboration of the office on others, or the inspirational experience of working while traveling abroad. If organizations want to propel imagination and inspiration forward, then they need to look at technology to solve these challenges, so everyone may enjoy a future where workplace imagination leads to inspiration and true genius thrives.

Contributor: Erin Rapacki
Director of Marketing, Suitable Technologies, Inc.

How Beam Protects your Privacy

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Have a quick video call over your smartphone about work related matters, and you may feel secure; you may think that there are so many free video calls that certainly nobody is listening to yours. However, as people begin bringing their own device (BYOD) to work, IT professionals are increasingly sensitive to the security measures offered over video.  At Suitable Technologies, the makers of the Beam® Smart Presence System (SPS) including BeamPro™ and Beam+™, we take security seriously for the new video collaboration option called “remote presence.”

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Learn how Beam extends video conferencing outside the meeting room.

The video conferencing software used for the Beam SPS is developed internally by the team at Suitable Technologies in order to control all aspects of security, quality, and experience for communication and motion throughout a building. The System seamlessly integrates low latency audio/video with real-time driving controls enabling ‘presence’ rather than simply conversation.  With a minimum bandwidth of ~1Mbps, high-quality video is prioritized so users always see where they are going, enabling safe movement in even the most crowded environment; by matching latencies for both driving and video, the pilot has easy, intuitive control.  Extensive user permission tools work with all Beam models and encompass the entire user network.  Suitable Technologies employees rely on Beam every day for their own needs: remote work, home and family, events, and meetings with Fortune 500 customers.

Employees of Suitable enjoy the freedom to live anywhere while being a full-time, team contributor in Palo Alto.

In addition to robust, integrated video conferencing and mobility software, the hardware and Beam management tools embody security and privacy protocols that enforce secure face-to-face collaboration, for example:

  • The Beam App. does NOT have built-in video/audio recording or photo-taking.
  • Beam video must be on at all times so locals know who is piloting the SPS.
  • When in use, the Beam ‘neck’ is illuminated so people know a remote pilot is present even if the local cannot see the screen.
  • Similar to providing key card access to a building, Beam site administrators can grant permission to a Beam temporarily – on specific days, for specific hours.
  • Administrators can require that a SPS must be answered with a physical tap by the local person when a remote pilot seeks to beam in.

A secure video collaboration solution is required to enable sensitive face-to-face interactions when travel is not an option. With assurance that Beams provide secure, safe, and reliable remote presence with colleagues; users have access to more jobs, are able to manage teams across oceans, and can transact business with a sense physical presence that is otherwise unachievable.

Synopsis from the Network Administration Guide on SPS security specs and operability:

Beam communications is protected using industry standard TLS (Transport Layer Security). Beam session data (audio/video) is encrypted using AES256 and authenticated using HMACSHA1. Encryption and decryption happen at the endpoints.

The Beam Service allows a pilot using a Beam App to connect to a Smart Presence System (SPS). The Service facilitates the following communication processes for Suitable Technologies:

  • System Configuration
  • System Diagnostic data (e.g., performance data, errors and logs relating to the software’s behavior, etc)
  • Software Updates
  • Session establishment signaling (e.g., exchange of IP/Port information between the Beam App and Beam SPS)

A session between the Beam SPS and the Beam App occurs via a direct peer-to-peer UDP (User Datagram Protocol) connection. A Beam session can flow either via:

  • a direct connection, where no Beam session data (audio/video) flows through the Beam Service, or
  • when it is not possible to establish a direct connection, a relay server is selected and used to forward the encrypted session traffic between the SPS and App.
  • If connection between either the Beam App to the relay or the Beam SPS to the relay is not possible, a session is not established.
  • Additional protection can be provided by employing a VPN (Virtual Private Network).

Suitable Technologies’ employees are not allowed to connect to customer SPSs without written permission from the site administrator. Employees will never connect to SPSs in a manner that could provide unknown or unseen audio/video access to customer’s facilities. All access to SPSs, whether routine or for troubleshooting, is auditable.

PublicRelay

Suitable Technologies can provide a packaged version of the relay software for the customer to run on their own network. If a Beam is configured to use an internal relay, session data (audio/video) never passes through Suitable Technologies’ Beam Service.

For more information, please contact info@suitabletech.com.

Contributor: Erin Rapacki
Director of Marketing, Suitable Technologies, Inc.

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The Pillars of Video Collaboration

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Companies have expanded globally and wish to work with the best of the best: have the best teammates, use the best vendors, and hire the best consultants. However, business operations take place in many different, often unique, facilities and keeping those locations connected is a constant challenge. Nearly every company has a team member who is vital to the success of the organization that is not co-located at headquarters or a central hub of activity. In fact, Forrester predicts that 43% of the US the workforce will be working remotely by 2016. To resolve this challenge, companies have invested heavily in promoting healthy communication between their remote and local teams with various technologies: the telephone, file sharing and project management software, and video communication when travel is not an option.

When purchasing a video communication tool people must consider its purpose: do they want it to be used in all collaboration spaces? Is video needed for colleagues who work from home? Will conferencing be used for formal meetings between multiple facilities? Companies have many options to select from, but they must consider how it benefits their unique organizational challenges. As a guide, here are the technologies we recommend for various methods of remote collaboration:

1. Video Calling (e.g. Google Hangouts and Skype) offers an informal ubiquitous video service over a low bandwidth connection. These services are best used for casual desk-to-desk calling or for distributed teams who work without a central office.

2. Video Conferencing (e.g. high–definition room systems) offers groups an ability to be face-to-face for a formal meeting. The technology is optimized for scheduled, multi-point, and room-to-room conferencing.

3. Remote Presence (e.g. a self contained, remote controlled, video conferencing device on wheels) is a new tool for natural collaboration in all workspaces outside the meeting room or office: labs, white board areas, factory floors, shops, cafeterias, manufacturing plants, showcases, tech centers, and more. Remote presence devices implement their video conferencing software differently in order to optimize for low latency, over a relatively low bandwidth internet connection, for proactive driving control. They come complete with cameras, a microphone array, speakers, a battery, and digital display.

Workplace interactions range from the very formal to the informal, from quick chats between colleagues to large presentations. Remote presence it is a distinct “third pillar” that adds to a company’s strategy where experts may be invited to join in team collaboration anywhere the action is happening. Removing geography as a barrier to recruiting helps teams hire the right people; especially small companies like startups who require the best. Notably, as referenced in a 2014 study from CB Insights 46% of the startups listed failed due to not having the right management team. In addition, remote presence is capable of connecting users to their teams throughout multiple operating locations a day, so those who find it most valuable are remote employees, consultants, clients, vendors, operations managers, and business travelers who wish to connect back to their headquarters while away.

When successful team dynamics require spontaneity, collaboration, or attendance at an event – only remote presence enables people to come together without boundaries. Video collaboration is required among global teams everywhere, including meetings between desks and conference rooms, but now this “third pillar” makes it easier for a person’s presence to be made available in all workspaces; thereby creating a healthy, transparent, and positive collaboration environment that mobilizes the workforce and provides a way for teams to have equal access to everyone.

Contributor: Erin Rapacki
Director of Marketing, Suitable Technologies, Inc.